Book Review: Ready Player One

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I was psyched to read Ready Player One. I had heard such good things about it from patrons at the library, it was popping up all over my social media, and I knew it would be full of 80’s references. So don’t hate me for being majorly let down by this book…

Description:

In the year 2044, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he’s jacked into the virtual utopia known as the OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines,  based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. When Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize. The race is on, and if Wade’s going to survive, he’ll have to win—and confront the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

(Description from Goodreads.)

Review:

This book had so much promise. In the first quarter, I felt like I could have been reading a script for an episode of Black Mirror. I liked learning about their virtual world, and I loved the John Hughes references (as any normal person would). Read More

Book Review: Through the Woods by Emily Carroll

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Description:

‘It came from the woods. Most strange things do.’

Five mysterious, spine-tingling stories follow journeys into (and out of?) the eerie abyss.

These chilling tales spring from the macabre imagination of acclaimed and award-winning comic creator Emily Carroll.

Come take a walk in the woods and see what awaits you there…

                                                                                      (Description from Goodreads)

Review of Through the Woods:

Deliciously eerie and best read in the dark with a single candle flickering, rain beating against the windows, and the wind howling. This graphic novel was a ton of fun to read if you like to have a thrill. Though none of the stories were keep-you-from-sleeping scary, they were all eerie and chilling and made you want to curl up under a blanket. Read More

Book Review: Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maude Montgomery

Anne of Green Gables

 Description: 

Everyone’s favorite redhead, the spunky Anne Shirley, begins her adventures at Green Gables, a farm outside Avonlea, Prince Edward Island. When the freckled girl realizes that the elderly Cuthberts wanted to adopt a boy instead, she begins to try to win them and, consequently, the reader, over.
(Description from Goodreads.)

Review of Anne of Green Gables:

Anne (with an e) simply stole my heart. Her curiosity and limitless imagination can’t help but make you smile, and her even stubbornness and temper are surprisingly endearing. Anne reminded me to be in constant wonder of the world.

Though I didn’t think the writing was particularly noteworthy, it was the characters that turned this sweet story into a timeless classic. Anne had me laughing out loud (particularly when she stomped on the candy valentine Gilbert gave her). Read More

Book Review: How To Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis

Description:

Eleanor Davis’s How to be Happy is the artist’s first collection of graphic/literary short stories. Davis is one of the finest cartoonists of her generation, and has been producing comics since the mid-2000s. Happy represents the best stories she’s drawn for such curatorial venues as Mome and No-Brow, as well as her own self-publishing and web efforts. Davis achieves a rare, subtle poignancy in her narratives that are at once compelling and elusive, pregnant with mystery and a deeply satisfying emotional resonance. Happy shows the full range of Davis’s graphic skills — sketchy drawing, polished pen and ink line work, and meticulously designed full color painted panels– which are always in the service of a narrative that builds to a quietly devastating climax.

(Description from Goodreads.)

How To Be Happy – Review:

Despite the title, Davis makes it clear that her graphic novel is not a how-to on happiness. I picked this book up from the library because the cover image was so striking and beautiful. I know you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but if it makes a positive impression, isn’t that ok? I tend to think so. Read More

Book Review: The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

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Description:

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other Handmaids are valued only if their ovaries are viable. Offred can remember the years before, when she lived and made love with her husband, Luke; when she played with and protected her daughter; when she had a job, money of her own, and access to knowledge. But all of that is gone now…                                                                                                                        (Description from Goodreads.)

Review:

The Handmaid’s Tale is a hard book to like, but an easy book to love. It’s terrifying, it’s beautifully written, it’s a dystopia that doesn’t feel that far off from becoming real. It’s like a shot of whiskey that burns your throat, but once it settles in your stomach you enjoy it. It’ll also make you want to get your ass off the cozy couch you were just reading on and march in the streets to prevent it from ever becoming reality. I read this story as a warning: if we stay complacent, here’s what can happen. So we better get moving! Read More

Welcome to Bookish Bliss

Hi there!

I started Bookish Bliss in order to gush about books with fellow readers. Even though I work in a library, I still can’t get enough of books and literary talk. This blog is where I’ll review books, share literary news, and connect with bibliophiles (like you)! You can connect with me via social media (links at the top and bottom of the page) or through Goodreads.

Below, I’ve written my Reader’s Manifesto, that way you can get a sense of who I am as a reader and reviewer.

Here’s what I know for sure: Reading is a superpower.

Life is too short to finish a book you don’t enjoy.

I believe there is no such thing as a guilty pleasure book. Read what you love!

I want to live in a world where everyone has a personal library and where no one can choose just one favorite book because they love too many. 

Read past your bedtime.

Embrace diverse opinions of books (even of your favorite titles).

There is nothing better than cozying up with a good book and a cup of tea. 

Read diverse books. We should care deeply about diverse books and bookshelf diversity so that we learn about the world around us, and about ourselves.

We are responsible for our words. Be passionate about books that you love and considerate of the books you don’t. 

I will spread the bookish bliss.

Anything you think I missed? Add your comment below!

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